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Author Topic: Can someone clear up instructions to get NOAA .KAP files x-fered to Garmin 78s?  (Read 13089 times)

WindJunkieTX

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I have been following instructions I've found, but most do not work.

I have downloaded some NOAA charts in .KAP format, and they work nicely in OpenCPN.
I have used NOAA's Reprojector to output them as both .TIF and .BMP, aligned them in GoogleEarth and saved them as .KMZ files, and moved them to the \Garmin\Custom Maps folder on my GPS, but that's where it ends...I never see the maps and they are not in the list to be enabled.

I have downloaded the FLtopo (which is a .EXE file), and that installed and works nicely on my GPS.

At this point instructions seem to get confusing and diverge...

One site says the .KMZ should simply be copied to the \Garmin\Custom Maps folder on the device...which I've tried, but see no results.

Another seems to indicate the BMaP2MP app should be next, but that seems to want only a .BMP file as input (according to how I understand the README_ENG.TXT file), and that file apparently should be made by OziExplorer

The maps I've created seem to load nicely in BaseCamp, and they display when I connect the 78s to the computer and click on the internal storage of the 78s.

...but so far nothing makes them show up on the GPS itself.

Can anyone give me advice?

Thanks, J

Boyd

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You kind of lost me when I got to the part about the FL topo....  That is a vector based standard Garmin map (.img file) which is completely different from .kmz "custom maps".

The .kmz maps have some strict technical limitations. Each individual "tile" can be no larger than 1024x1024 pixels with a max size of 3MB (IIRC). You may have a total of 100 of these individual tiles - which must be non-progressive .jpg images. A .kmz file is a "container" than can hold multiple images.

I think Basecamp is less particular about opening .kmz files, so just because it works there doesn't necessarily mean it will work on your GPS.

Now BMaP2MP is something else completely different. It is used to convert raster imagery to vector based Garmin maps. At best, this kind of software does a mediocre job. It is generally only used by people with older GPSes that don't support the new .kmz format.

Have a look at g-raster. I don't know anything about NOAA charts, but the author is a member here and often helps other forum members. His software should read your NOAA files and make the conversion pretty straightforward. http://moagu.com/?page_id=155

babj615

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One site says the .KMZ should simply be copied to the \Garmin\Custom Maps folder on the device...which I've tried, but see no results.

...but so far nothing makes them show up on the GPS itself.

Can anyone give me advice?

Thanks, J

Try \Garmin\Custommaps\ (no space)
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WindJunkieTX

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Boyd, thanks for the reply, I'm very new at this, I just mentioned the FL Topo because I had success with it...it had nothing to do with the other files I'm trying to get into the GPS.

Well, I've spent a lot of time messing about with this, and I've got it down to a reasonable sequence:
1) get a NOAA Chart from their website
2) run it through NOAA's Reprojector, saving it as a .TIF
3) use Paint Shop Pro (or equivalent) to crop it if necessary to 10,000 x 10,000 pixels or less
4) open GoogleEarth & add it as an image overlay, size and angle it there to match the underlying terrain, save as a .KMZ
5) use G-Raster to make that into a .KML
6) use BaseCamp to load it and send it to the GPS

However I've run into a problem: GoogleEarth seems to no longer want to load the entire .TIF file, it loads/shows about 1/3 of the map.  I am suspicious that this is an issue with file size because very small maps seem to work ok.  Furthermore, the first map I loaded was 8000 x 4600 approx, that one loaded fine but now I cannot get another to load that is near that size.

Is there another way to carry the position and orientation information over without using GoogleEarth?  Or perhaps is there some limit I don't know about on file size or dimensions?


Thanks, J.

popej

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Couldn't you do it with vector data? I think they are available for US. You could use tools like GlobalMapper, QGIS, cgpsmapper to process data. It won't be easy task, but IMO this is a proper way to get usable map for GPS.

Boyd

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As I said, I don't know anything about NOAA charts. But my understanding is that g-raster will open the NOAA files directly. If so, you could skip steps 1-4. :)

I think mapc2mapc might be another approach. See this thread on Garmin's forum: https://forums.garmin.com/showthread.php?38658-Simplified-method-for-create-custom-satellite-maps

Especially this part:

Quote
Update: I've been receiving help from John, the developer of MapC2MapC. I'm now able to load both tif and kap type files and select/unselect tiles prior to creating a kmz file which can then be loaded into my Garmin eTrex 20. For example, here's the recipe I use to create a Garmin custom map from USGS aerial data:
1. Goto: http://www.csc.noaa.gov/dataviewer
2. Zoom and pan to area of interest
3. Select Imagery or streets view as desired (top right of window)
4. Click draw area
5. Drag a rectangle around the desired area
6. Click Change data type, select imagery, then Apply
7. Click change data provider, select provider then apply eg, USGS
8. Verify that 'Add to cart' is enabled otherwise no match for data provider
9. Click Add to Cart
10. Click Checkout
11. Click Next
12. Click 'Let me Edit choices'
13. Select 'WGS84' (default is NAD83)
14. Click Next
15. Enter email address and zip code
16. Click Next
17. Wait for summary email which gives download URL
18. Download the file and unzip it
19. Rename tif file as desired
20. Start Mapc2Mapc
21. Edit/Locate 7-zip (7z.exe)
22. Edit/Locate FWTools (listgeo.exe)
23. Edit/Preferences/Garmin select 'Advanced Garmin Tile Control'
24. File/Load Calibrated Map and select desired file
25. Select WGS84
26. File/Write Garmin Custom Map (kmz)
27. Deselect unwanted tiles
28. Click Save then OK
29. Turn on gps and connect usb cable
30. Copy kmz file to microSD card at: G:\Garmin\CustomMaps (alternatively use BaseCamp)

I have attached a picture of geoTIFF file downloaded (ie, blue outline) which shows which tiles have been selected. I started with 182 tiles and ended with 77. Based upon my success, I highly recommend MapC2MapC. The ability to select and unselect files allows me to include a much larger area of interest on a Garmin custom map than would otherwise be possible. Comments appreciated.
Pete

I agree with Popej about vector maps being better, but as he said, that could be rather involved. And I'm not sure if the data is so readily available. Whenever someone asks why there aren't more marine maps here at GPSFileDepot, the response is that vector data is hard to find.

The big problem with raster based maps (.kmz files) is that your GPS only supports 100 tiles, and that is going to really limit you to a small area. I made a bunch of USGS 24k raster maps a few years ago, and 100 tiles would only cover about 20 miles x 20 miles.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2013, 08:48:21 AM by Boyd »

dbperry

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There was a NOAA map discussion a while back:

http://forums.gpsfiledepot.com/index.php/topic,2951.0.html

See especially my post...Ok, I'll repeat it here:

So with my Montana, get the raster chart in TIFF, and convert it to .kmz with g-raster
That is my mission?
Thanks.
-Bill

Actually, the G-Raster program has native support for the NOAA BSB file format. So your mission is even simpler:
1) download the charts you want from NOAA in the NOAA BSB native format
2) Use G-Raster to convert them to KMZ

Reference:
http://moagu.com/?page_id=155
(See the second bullet under G-Raster features)

Disclaimer: I haven't tried this - it looks interesting - so I don't have first hand knowledge that it will work...

Dave

Using G-Raster and the BSB format from NOAA will eliminate all the problems you are having about file and tile size (as discussed by Boyd above), as well as eliminate any need to manually geo-reference the maps. I still haven't tried it, since my 78sc came with the garmin marine maps (in vector format) already loaded. So your mileage may vary. Let us know what method you finally use and how it works.

And I agree, getting vector data would be better than raster / KMZ, but at least there is a way to get raster KMZ Garmin Custom Maps - which, using G-Raster, should be relatively easy (hopefully).

Dave

popej

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Read NOAA S-57 vector with Global Mapper, export in polish format and compile with cgpsmapper. You would probably get a map in 10 minutes. Not a good map, it would need more editing to look correctly. But basic procedure could be as simple as that.

maps4gps

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Quote
Whenever someone asks why there aren't more marine maps here at GPSFileDepot, the response is that vector data is hard to find.
? ?? ???

 NOAA has had most of the nautical charts available in both vector and image format for a few years now, and they are constantly adding the remaining charts and keeping the files current. 
I would say the real reason is (as usual) that no one with an interest in them has cared to use their time to create such a mapset and share it with others.

Boyd

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I'm sure you guys are right. I was just repeating something I've seen posted here in the past. But I might be mixing apples and oranges too. Is good data available for inland lakes as well?

popej

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maps4gps

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I was referring to the NOAA ocean and Great Lakes nautical charts as mentioned by the OP.
ACE (Army Corps of Engineers) has depth data in shape file format for the major navigable rivers.
A few States offer depth data for some of the larger lakes in their respective state.
Garmin Lakes product 'covers more than 17,000 freshwater lakes, reservoirs and rivers throughout the continental U.S.'

Boyd

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Some good info here - thanks. Personally, I like to keep my feet on dry land so I don't really have any interest in marine maps.  ;)

FWIW, here are a couple old threads that led me to believe the data is hard to find.

http://forums.gpsfiledepot.com/index.php/topic,988.msg5944.html#msg5944

your best bet would be to google search for
lake name bathymetric data

and if you find any shapefiles let us know and we can put one together for you.  The data is hard to come by.

http://forums.gpsfiledepot.com/index.php/topic,2363.msg13680.html#msg13680

Digital bathymetric data is hard to come by so there likely aren't any.